Pottery Marking with only the number 233 on a pair of cache pot jardinieres

by Lynn
(New Zealand)

Pottery Marking with only the number 233 on a pair of cache pot jardinieres

Pottery Marking with only the number 233 on a pair of cache pot jardinieres

Pottery Marking with only the number 233 on a pair of cache pot jardinieres
Pottery Marking with only the number 233 on a pair of cache pot jardinieres

Pottery Marking with only the number 233 on a pair of cache pot jardinieres:- I have a pair of vases which I was told were brought out from England around 1893 but have no idea if this is correct or not, they were in my step-fathers family and this is when they reached New Zealand.

The measurement is approx 4-1/4" in height and are 5-1/4" across at the top (incl handles).

The colouring is a olive green fading out to pale greenish/yellow. The have shiny gold relief around rim, handles and a narrow gold band approx 3/4" down from rim. Also stand on four shiny feet.

The picture is of two swans swimming in a pond with water lilies, looks like olive green and gold relief butterflies either side of the picture of swans. Also olive green leaf with gold again at bottom of picture and gold bull rushes enveloping the picture also at back of vase.

There is a stamped number on one of the vases
'233'the other one has something stamped in but all can tell is it is a three digit number but unfortunately can not make out the numbers.

I hope someone can give me some idea where these vases were made and details of year etc. These were passed down to me from my mother and I would like to know a little of their history.

Thank you in advance for any advice you can give me.

Lynn

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Reply By Peter (admin)

Hi Lynn

You don't say if the swans on each pot are hand-painted and each different. It doesn't looks so from the far away photo.

I feel the date may be right, at a stretch, but without trying to talk your pots down, I feel these have been done, if you like, to be affordable majolica pieces for ordinary people.

Minton (the people who coined the term majolica and brought it to Victorian popularity) made delightful wares and also quality wares and were all the rage with the aspirational at one point. They were also expensive for a lower wage earner. Like all fads, as the elite got bored and moved on, the masses wanted a piece of the action, and items like your pots were made to satisfy the demand - unbranded and much cheaper than Minton.

So they are not high priced collectibles as such, but they are interesting as a cultural phenomenon and look very well preserved. Without your provenance, I would have said they look a bit like items made in post-war Japan in the 1950's.

Best regards

Peter (admin)

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